21 Aug 2017 Ferado

Apart from sending half of his monthly income home to his mother and three siblings in Katihar, Bihar, 19-year-old Anzar Alam saves a tiny sum every month for emergencies. But now that his village has been hit by a flood, he feels helpless. “I haven’t been paid in the last two months, so I have spent my savings on rent and food…I need money urgently so my family in Katihar can survive,” said Alam, one of the 1,600 labourers with the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) protesting at Jantar Mantar since August 17. Along with the labourers, contractors too have taken to the streets demanding “pending payments of nine months from DMRC and FEMC Pratibha,” which, according to labour contractor Ashish Dwivedi, amounts to “Rs 25 crore”. “We are paid by FEMC Pratibha but nine months ago when we stopped work, DMRC intervened and assured us that they will pay us… since then, partial payments have been made over a month or two,” said Dwivedi, who has 300 labourers under him. When The Indian Express approached the DMRC, Anuj Dayal, Executive Director, Corporate Communications, said, “A section of workers hired by one of DMRC’s contractors, M/s FEMC Pratibha have been agitating over alleged non-payment of dues for the last few days. DMRC would like to clarify that these workers have not been directly recruited or hired by Delhi Metro.” DMRC also does not pay the salaries directly to these workers. The contractor has been directed to clear all dues and DMRC is also closely monitoring the situation.A Metro spokesperson added, “If labourer makes any complaint to DMRC regarding non-payment of wages, DMRC takes appropriate steps. In this case, no individual labourer has made complaints. This is the matter of dues between sub-contractor and the main contractor.” Even as the rain brought the city to a standstill on Saturday, hundreds continued to sit on a dharna at Jantar Mantar, along with 25 labour contractors. “I have paid salaries of the 250 labourers under me for seven months by taking loans…I am in debt now, no longer capable of paying them, which is why we are protesting,” said contractor Babloo Tripathi. The labourers and contractors also revealed that work on Delhi Metro phase III is on hold due to the protest. “At the moment, no work is happening at the nine Metro stations of phase III, which is already delayed by many months…if they don’t meet our demand, we will also put functioning metro service on hold, and lie down on the tracks in protest,” said Tripathi. DMRC, on the other hand, maintained that “there is no delay. We are doing our structural and finishing work. These supply contractors were only doing house keeping work, helping the mechanical and electrical department in their work, the job of office attendants and other miscellaneous work. This is not affecting our schedule as these are ancillary activities”.Meanwhile, labourers such as Rajesh Yadav who hails from Bhadohi near Allahabad, continue to “ignore desperate phone calls from home as there is no money to send.”

INDIA: Apart from sending half of his monthly income home to his mother and three siblings in Katihar, Bihar, 19-year-old Anzar Alam saves a tiny sum every month for emergencies. But now that his village has been hit by a flood, he feels helpless. “I haven’t been paid in the last two months, so I have spent my savings on rent and food…I need money urgently so my family in Katihar can survive,” said Alam, one of the 1,600 labourers with the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation (DMRC) protesting at Jantar Mantar since August 17.
Along with the labourers, contractors too have taken to the streets demanding “pending payments of nine months from DMRC and FEMC Pratibha,” which, according to labour contractor Ashish Dwivedi, amounts to “Rs 25 crore”. “We are paid by FEMC Pratibha but nine months ago when we stopped work, DMRC intervened and assured us that they will pay us… since then, partial payments have been made over a month or two,” said Dwivedi, who has 300 labourers under him.
When The Indian Express approached the DMRC, Anuj Dayal, Executive Director, Corporate Communications, said, “A section of workers hired by one of DMRC’s contractors, M/s FEMC Pratibha have been agitating over alleged non-payment of dues for the last few days. DMRC would like to clarify that these workers have not been directly recruited or hired by Delhi Metro.”
DMRC also does not pay the salaries directly to these workers. The contractor has been directed to clear all dues and DMRC is also closely monitoring the situation.A Metro spokesperson added, “If labourer makes any complaint to DMRC regarding non-payment of wages, DMRC takes appropriate steps. In this case, no individual labourer has made complaints. This is the matter of dues between sub-contractor and the main contractor.”
Even as the rain brought the city to a standstill on Saturday, hundreds continued to sit on a dharna at Jantar Mantar, along with 25 labour contractors. “I have paid salaries of the 250 labourers under me for seven months by taking loans…I am in debt now, no longer capable of paying them, which is why we are protesting,” said contractor Babloo Tripathi.
The labourers and contractors also revealed that work on Delhi Metro phase III is on hold due to the protest. “At the moment, no work is happening at the nine Metro stations of phase III, which is already delayed by many months…if they don’t meet our demand, we will also put functioning metro service on hold, and lie down on the tracks in protest,” said Tripathi.
DMRC, on the other hand, maintained that “there is no delay. We are doing our structural and finishing work. These supply contractors were only doing house keeping work, helping the mechanical and electrical department in their work, the job of office attendants and other miscellaneous work. This is not affecting our schedule as these are ancillary activities”.Meanwhile, labourers such as Rajesh Yadav who hails from Bhadohi near Allahabad, continue to “ignore desperate phone calls from home as there is no money to send.”

20 Aug 2017 Ferado

BMKQ General Assembly affirms commitment to Filipino migrant worker rights

QATAR: The Bayanihan ng Manggagawa sa Konstruksyon ng Qatar (BMKQ) – a Qatar-based organization of Filipino migrant workers – held it’s 2017 General Assembly. The event was attended by more than a hundred BMKQ members and leaders of allied organizations.

BMKQ is a Qatar branch of one the BWI’s Philippine affiliates, the Federation of Free Workers (FFW). Formally established in 2015, BMKQ was immediately given accreditation by the Philippine Embassy in Doha as a Filipino community association to represent the interests of the three hundred thousand Filipinos in in Qatar.

BWI Asia-Pacific Regional Representative Apolinar Tolentino gave solidarity greetings at the General Assembly. “Amidst growing instability in the Gulf region, we are emboldened to see BMKQ affirm their commitments to defending the rights of Filipino migrants in Qatar’s construction sector. We wish them great success in building working class power at this critical moment.”

The event also served as the venue for the showcase BWI’s Global Sports Manual entitled, “Labour is Part of the Team: A manual in campaigning in mega-sporting events.” Tolentino noted that, “the manual is a milestone in BWI’s work for the protection and promotion of human and workers’ rights in mega-sporting events, and we look forward to expanding our presence on future events”.

The assembly ratified the Report of BMKQ’s outgoing President on future priorities and elected new officers for 2017 – 2018, including Ressie S. Fos as new President. An elated Ressie said it excited him to see new members lining up to pay their membership dues. “Our members are mostly from low-income level jobs. Every cent counts for them and their families back home, but because of their commitment to the principles and programs of the organization, they are willing to shell out hard-earned money.”

Outgoing President Ka Alan Bulan emphasized that they strived for “quality as much as quantity. We want members that are fully committed to the vision and mission of the BMKQ. Such commitment is translated to active participation in our activities and payment of membership dues. These for me are the hallmark of genuine camaraderie and organization.”

Among those that delivered messages of solidarity during the assembly is the leader-representative of Bayanihan, a newly formed alliance of more than 18 organizations of Filipino migrant communities in Qatar, comprising grassroots membership from sectors like construction and home service workers. The BMKQ has been instrumental in the formation of this broad, community alliance.

“Labour is Part of the Team: A Manual for Campaigning in Mega-Sporting Events” can be downloaded here.

Back to News

Top

20 Aug 2017 Ferado

Left-Wing Coalition Calls for National March on August 27 to Demand Release of Rif Detainees

Rabat – La Fédération de la gauche démocratique (FGD), a coalition of three lef-wing parties, has called for a national march on August 27 in Rabat to demand the release of detained Rif activists.

The youth wings of the three parties issued a joint statement condemning the excessive use of violence against the Hirak (protest movement in Al Hoceima and its nearby towns in Rif), which led to the death of activist Imad El Attabi.

El Attabi was injured in the head during the July 20 national march in Al Hoceima. He remained in coma in the military hospital in Rabat until announced death on Tuesday.

FGD said the call to national march on August 27 is intended to show support for the Hirak and stand against the state’s policies aiming at undermining citizens’ rights.

Calls for releasing Rif prisoners have been issued since a massive of arrests targeted Hirak activists in late May and throughout June and July.

On July 29, dozens of activists were released on the occasion of the Throne Day but the bulk of the but a larger number of almost 200 protesters remain in prison in Al Hoceima and Casablanca where they are prosecuted for heavy charges such as “undermining people’s loyalty to state institutions” and threatening the security of the state.

The arrest, prosecution and detention of Rif activist put the government not only at odds with the residents of Rif but also with the rest of Morocco where an important segment of the population, civil society and political elite have shown support for the protest movement in the northern Moroccan region.

20 Aug 2017 Ferado

Claiming rights under the kafala system

The Middle East plays host to the largest number of migrant domestic workers in the world. National statistical sources collated by the ILO estimate that 1.6 million migrant domestic workers are working in the Levant and countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). Another estimate, from the International Trade Union Confederation, puts the number even higher at 2.5 million. These women traditionally hail from Asian countries like the Philippines, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and India, however Ethiopia, Madagascar, Kenya and Uganda have also emerged as new countries of origin.

The admission, residence and exit of migrant domestic workers are governed by the kafala system, a private sponsorship scheme for temporary migrant workers. Kafala ties the work and residence permits of a domestic worker to a specific employer; makes residence permit renewal the responsibility of the employer; and makes employment termination, transfer from one employer to another, and exit from the country contingent on the sponsor’s approval. It is a system that leaves workers at the complete mercy of their employers.

Further, domestic workers continue to be excluded from the scope of national labour laws with the argument that domestic work cannot be regulated like other sectors without violating the sanctity of the employer’s household. Employment contracts thus regulate the employer-agency-worker relationship; however these documents carry little weight without adequate inspection mechanisms. Even where standard unified contracts exist – such as in Kuwait, Jordan, and Lebanon – agreements negotiated bilaterally with countries of origin supersede them, promoting a race to the bottom in the working and living conditions of domestic workers from different nationalities and encouraging stereotypes about the quality of the work performed by women from certain countries.

As a result, domestic workers are overworked, underpaid and cheated by brokers and recruiters. They face considerable barriers to accessing justice and their embassies and consulates do not have the resources or capacity to respond to the volume of complaints. Furthermore, when domestic workers – faced with unfair laws, barriers to justice, and employer impunity – decide to leave the homes of their employers they are declared “absconded” and become susceptible to arrest, long periods of detention, excessive fines, and finally deportation and blacklisting.

Over the past 10 years, international organisations and NGOs in the Middle East have launched advocacy campaigns, submitted legislative proposals, and offered a variety of legal and socio-medical services to migrant domestic workers. These initiatives were rarely guided by the priorities of domestic workers, in part because very few spaces exist for domestic workers in the Middle East to articulate their concerns. The result has been a plethora of well-intentioned but incongruent programmes and services for domestic workers. This is progressively changing. Inspired by images on Facebook and Instagram of domestic workers taking the streets across the world, domestic workers across the Middle East are consolidating in nationality-based or sectorial organisations to make their demands heard.

The following is a description of the barriers to domestic workers’ unionising in the Middle East; a review of emerging models of collective voice outside the union model; and a discussion of the role of the International Domestic Workers’ Federation (IDWF) in reconciling the organic social dynamics of organising among migrant domestic workers with classical trade unions.
Barriers to the unionisation of domestic workers in the Middle East

Freedom of association is generally restricted in the Middle East. Trade unions and strikes are banned in Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. Only workers’ committees are allowed, although not for women migrant domestic workers. Domestic workers can join existing unions in Lebanon and committees within union federations in Jordan, Kuwait and Bahrain (ILO, 2015). Across the Levant and the GCC, domestic workers are not allowed to run for union-elected positions on account of their migration status.

Domestic workers in Lebanon succeeded in establishing their first sectorial union in the Middle East in 2015 under the umbrella of the National Federation of Employees’ and Workers’ Unions in Lebanon (FENASOL). The union remains unrecognised by the Lebanese Ministry of Labour, but is reported to count over 500 members. It was formed through an ILO-led process involving women migrant domestic workers; four NGOs (i.e., Nasawiya’s Anti-Racism Movement, Insan Association, Frontiers Ruwad (FR), Kafa (Enough Violence & Exploitation); the National Federation of Employees’ and Workers’ Unions in Lebanon (FENASOL); and the International Domestic Workers Federation (IDWF). The 20-month process, completed in January 2014, had three main objectives: (1) raise domestic workers’ consciousness to encourage active participation in advocacy campaigns; (2) promote collaboration between domestic workers, unions, and NGOs over priorities and interventions; and (3) create synergies with the global domestic workers’ movement (Tayah, 2014).

The 80 participating domestic workers provided the critical mass required to establish the domestic workers’ union in January 2015. Over the past two years the union has concluded agreements with trade unions in the countries of origin, such as the General Federation of Nepalese Trade Unions (GEFONT) and the Confederation of Ethiopian Trade Unions (CETU), to extend protection to domestic workers across the migration cycle. These agreements, unfortunately, lack focus and are not supported by implementation protocols.

The union has also expended substantial energy campaigning for recognition by the Lebanese authorities, but has yet to define a policy position and strategy on domestic work outside of the generic anti-kafala slogans. Union engagement at the policy level is hampered by the sector’s fragmentation across recruiters and brokers at origin and destination; multiple government agencies; origin country embassies; a multitude of policy spaces (national, binational, regional, interregional, global); and transnational policy issues that are at the crossroad of care, migration and employment regimes. All of these require a high level of technical knowledge that FENASOL, in spite of its heightened awareness to the challenges in the sector, still lacks.

Elsewhere, in May 2017, the Arab Trade Union Confederation (the Arab office of the International Trade Union Confederation) supported establishing a national committee of migrant workers as part of the General Federation for Jordanian Trade Unions (GFJTU). The committee is headed by the president of the federation and composed of the presidents of the construction, garment, public services and municipality workers’ unions. It aims to represent migrant workers, including domestic workers. The General Federation of Bahraini Trade Unions (GFBTU) had also set up a committee for migrant workers that will include a focus on domestic workers. These are welcome developments, but the trend toward migrant committees rather than domestic workers’ committees risks stymieing sector-based organising and undermining the principle of equality between migrants and nationals in their working conditions.

Practical, organisational, and political barriers frequently prevent domestic workers from joining domestic workers’ unions and migrant workers’ committees where they are permitted to do so in the Middle East.

Practical barriers include workplace isolation and restrictions on mobility, such as the denial of a leave day outside the home; bans on driving; long and unpredictable working hours; and the withholding of personal documents. Further, the fear of employer reprisal through contract termination (which may lead to deportation) is also commonly cited as a deterrent against organising efforts. Outreach efforts are further limited due to the absence of gathering areas such as parks and churches/temples in the GCC, which often greatly facilitate ad hoc forms of solidarity among domestic workers.

Gender dynamics, conflicts of interest and the inability of migrant workers to comply with strict union reporting requirements constitute organisation- and union-level deterrents for domestic workers. Men dominate the leadership structure of trade unions in the Middle East, and as a consequence they have largely been unable to welcome (women) domestic workers into their ranks. Trade unionists in the region are also employers of domestic workers, especially in the countries of the GCC. Finally, leaders of the domestic workers’ communities wear multiple hats: they are leaders in their migrant communities and leaders in the sectorial union. Their activism on the migration front is incongruent with strict trade union reporting requirements. The domestic workers’ leaders who worked with FENASOL and became the founders of the Domestic Workers Union of Lebanon have since moved on to form the Alliance of Migrant Domestic Workers in Lebanon. They continue to recognise the importance of the union but prefer the flexibility of organising around both sectoral and national lines.

Additional organisational barriers include low salaries, time limitations and language barriers. Low salaries mean that domestic workers are unable to pay membership dues and are unlikely to pay for transportation to attend union activities. Where the leave day is respected and tolerated by employers, domestic workers are also much more likely to rest rather than to spend their free time with the union. Language barriers in Middle Eastern countries – where domestic workers hail from over 12 countries of origin – are also an obstacle to sector-wide strategies.

More broadly, national level politics serve as another layer of obstacle for domestic worker organising. Population politics – migrants make up half the population of the GCC and over 90% of the population of certain countries like the UAE and Qatar – and the pressing issue of integrating refugee populations into labour markets of countries like Lebanon or Jordan are always thin lines to tread. On top of that, unions are often associated with certain political parties, and in some countries there is a growing rift between independent trade unions and government-supported trade unions. These dynamics greatly complicate organising in the region as these tensions are often instrumentalised to exclude domestic workers from unions and policy agendas.
The association model for collective voice in the Middle East

Domestic workers can set up or join trade unions but they can also adopt the association model of organising (e.g. community-based organisations), and/or experiment with arrangements straddling the association and union models (Bonner, 2010, pp. 10-15). There are many examples of migrant workers’ associations organising around gender, race, nationality and/or occupation in the Middle East. These associations have adopted union characteristics (e.g., paying membership fees) but do not have union powers.

In 2011, the Anti-Racism Movement in Lebanon established the Migrant Community Centre as a meeting space for migrant workers, and offered trainings in online activism, self-defence, computer skills, and grassroots advocacy. The MCC is now host to the Alliance of Migrant Domestic Workers in Lebanon, which is starting to receive attention. On Labour Day 2017 it led the Migrant Workers’ Parade, reading out a statement under the slogan “Kafala kills” that denounced the deportation of domestic workers who give birth in Lebanon and the deaths of migrant domestic workers that are not properly investigated. Photos of the parade and the workers’ demands featured on the evening news and in major national newspaper outlets. In follow-up to the parade, the alliance and concerned NGOs are planning a meeting with the Ministry of Labour to discuss potential strategic partnerships on and with domestic workers.

Other associational models in the region include Migrante International – the global alliance of Filipino Overseas Workers (OFWs) – which counts as a national chapter in Saudi Arabia. Migrante International receives complaints of OFWs in distress and their families and seeks redress for their grievances. It also regularly conducts research and fact finding missions and embarks on corresponding advocacy campaigns. The Sri Lankan Women’s Society in Lebanon organises around gender and nationality, although it is an association of mostly domestic workers, and The Domestic Workers Solidarity Network in Jordan represents Ethiopian, Bangladeshi, Indonesian, Sri Lankan and Filipina domestic workers. The network organises worker literacy programmes and legal clinics.

The Middle East has also experimented with hybrid forms of organising. With Anti-Slavery International (ASI), the Lebanese NGO ‘KAFA (enough) Violence & Exploitation’ supported the establishment of a self-help group of Nepalese women working as domestic workers in Lebanon (NARI) in 2012. NARI members are affiliated to GEFONT, becoming trade unionists at origin and civil society activists at destination. NARI advocated for the establishment of a Nepali embassy in Lebanon.

20 Aug 2017 Ferado

New Union Formed for Transportation Sector

BAHRAIN: A new union representing staff in the transportation, aviation and telecommunications sectors has been launched.

The General Federation for the Transportation Sector has been formed by unionists from Gulf Air, DHL and Bahrain Airport Services.

It initially aims to represent around 1,000 people employed by the three companies, but expects to grow its numbers by taking on members from other firms.

The aim is to improve the bargaining power of unionists in those sectors, who are seeking strength in numbers.

“The idea is to have a union that represents workers in the aviation, telecommunications and transportation sector in Bahrain,” said spokesman of the newly formed union Mahmood Salman.

“The new union is still in its infancy stage before we see more sectoral unions joining us.”

The new body has been formed by the National Labour Union of Gulf Air, the National Union of Bahrain Airport Service Workers and the DHL Trade Union.

It comes under the umbrella of the Bahrain Free Labour Unions Federation (Al Hurr), which represents around 20,000 members in all sectors.

“There are common issues faced by those employed in the sector and it makes sense to be a strong lobby group, rather than individual unions,” added Mr Salman.

The General Federation for the Transportation Sector has already held its first meeting, during which board members agreed to draft bylaws and seek co-operation from other unionists.

“At the moment there are so many infrastructure projects happening in Bahrain, like the airport modernisation programme,” said Mr Salman.